Frequently Asked Questions

General questions about Erasmus Mundus Masters Courses

This section provides an extract from the EM Program guidelines. For the full guideline text, please see here.

Click on the questions below to view the answers:

  1. What is an Erasmus Mundus Masters Course? What is its added value?

    Erasmus Mundus Masters Courses are integrated study programmes at masters level designed to distinguish Europe as a centre of excellence in higher education. (For a definition of an "integrated study programme", please see Question 3 below.) They are offered by at least three universities in three different European countries.

    Erasmus Mundus Masters Courses provide a distinctively European offer in higher education, which foresees a period of study in at least two universities in two different European countries. They result in the award of a double, a multiple or a joint degree recognised in the countries where the degree-awarding institutions are located. Moreover, they offer substantial study grants for top-quality graduate students and scholars, who enjoy high-quality hosting and welcome facilities while participating in an Erasmus Mundus Masters Course. Finally, Erasmus Mundus Masters consortia may establish Partnerships with third-country universities, under which grants are awarded to EU graduate students and scholars who are enrolled in the respective Erasmus Mundus Masters Course in order to study or work at the third-country partner university.

  2. What is an Erasmus Mundus Masters Course consortium and how does it work?

    An Erasmus Mundus Masters consortium is a group of at least three higher education institutions from three different European countries which has been selected to offer an Erasmus Mundus Masters Course under Action 1 of the EM programme. In cases where the consortium includes higher education institutions from an EEA/EFTA state or a candidate country, at least two of the participating institutions must be located in EU Member States.

    Each Consortium has a co-ordinating institution which has a legal agreement with the Education, Audio-Visual & Culture Executive Agency (EACEA) on behalf of the consortium. Throughout the duration of the Erasmus Mundus Masters course program, the co-ordinating institution is the Agency's contact partner who speaks and reports for the consortium. It is responsible for the financial management of the Erasmus Mundus Community funds paid to the consortium. However, the co-ordinating institution does not necessarily play a predominant role in the delivery of the Masters Course.

  3. What does an "integrated study programme" mean?

    An integrated study programme offered by an Erasmus Mundus Masters consortium has the following features:

    Course integration: delivery of a jointly developed curriculum or full recognition by the Erasmus Mundus Masters consortium of modules which are developed and delivered separately, but which together make up a common standard Masters Course.

    Joint criteria for admission and examination: students must be able to apply to a single Course with common standards for admission, a common application procedure and a joint student selection process in accordance with the relevant national legislation in the countries of participating institutions. Entry requirements must be clearly described and common to the Masters Course. Examinations passed at one institution of the Erasmus Mundus Masters consortium are recognised fully and automatically by the other institutions of the consortium.

    Mobility: students must carry out a period of study in at least two of the participating institutions. The mobility at a second institution cannot be replaced by virtual mobility. Neither can this mobility take place in institutions outside the consortium. The sequence of study periods spent in the various hosting institutions and the various possible mobility combinations must be known at the time of application for the Masters Course and made known to potential students in advance. In a minimum consortium of three partners (A, B, C), mobility combinations would normally be A+B, A+C, B+C or A+B+C. In cases where the consortium includes institutions from EEA-EFTA states, at least one of the hosting institutions must be located in a Member State.

    Guaranteed award of a recognised joint, or a double or a multiple degree after the successful conclusion of the Erasmus Mundus Masters Course : a clear definition of the nature and the form of the final degree(s) delivered is required. A double or multiple degree is defined as two or more nationally-recognised diplomas issued officially by two or more institutions involved in an integrated study programme. A joint degree is defined as a single diploma issued by at least two of the institutions offering an integrated study programme. The possibility to deliver a double degree is a minimal requirement.

    Common program fee: Program fees if any must be common to the Masters Course and must not depend on where the students start, continue or finish the Masters Course. There can be two different tuition fee amounts for non-overseas students on the one hand, and overseas students on the other. However, all overseas students must be treated in the same way regardless of their origin and whether or not they receive an Erasmus Mundus scholarship.

  4. Who can apply to Erasmus Mundus Masters Courses? How is a course at masters level defined?

    Erasmus Mundus Masters Courses are open to graduate students having obtained a first university degree from a study lasting a minimum of three years. The specific admission conditions are defined by each Erasmus Mundus Masters Course Consortium.

  5. How long does an Erasmus Mundus Masters Course last?

    An Erasmus Mundus Masters Course carries between a minimum of 60 and up to max.120 ECTS credits at masters level. 60 to 120 ECTS credits correspond to courses lasting from one up to two academic years. Erasmus Mundus Masters Courses all use the ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) or equivalent systems.

  6. Does Erasmus Mundus offer scholarships for part-time studies?

    No, the Erasmus Mundus Scholarships are intended for full-time studies.

  7. How many Erasmus Mundus Masters Courses are there? Which disciplines or subject areas are covered?

    All fields of study and disciplines are covered; a complete list of Erasmus Mundus Masters Courses can be consulted online.

  8. Which kinds of degrees are delivered at the end of an Erasmus Mundus Masters Course? In which countries are they recognised?

    Erasmus Mundus Masters Courses lead to the award of a recognised double, multiple or joint degree. A double degree is a minimum requirement. A double or multiple degree is defined as two or more national diplomas issued officially by two or more institutions involved in an integrated study programme. A joint degree is defined as a single diploma issued by at least two of the institutions offering an integrated study programme. The obtained degrees will be recognised in the countries where the degree-awarding institutions are located.

  9. What mobility requirements are there within an Erasmus Mundus Masters Course and to whom do they apply?

    All students (overseas and non-overseas) following an Erasmus Mundus Masters Course are obliged to study in at least two of the European institutions offering the Course. The sequence of study periods spent in the various institutions and the various possible mobility combinations must be known to potential students when they apply for the Course. The length of the study period in each of the participating institutions can vary, but normally at least 30% of the Course should be completed in a second institution.

  10. What language requirements are there for an Erasmus Mundus Masters Course? Is there a prescribed language of instruction?

    Erasmus Mundus Masters Courses provide students with the possibility of using at least two European languages spoken in the countries where the institutions offering the Erasmus Mundus Masters Courses are located. However, the use of at least two languages does not imply the use of two different languages of instruction: there can be a single language of instruction paired with the offer of learning a second language. Also, there is no obligation that the institutions use their national languages as the language of instruction.

    In any case, institutions should have a clearly identifiable language policy to promote national languages. This can include language training or other induction courses (e.g. “survival language” course, cultural induction), regardless of the language of instruction.

  11. What kinds of welcome and housing facilities should Erasmus Mundus Masters consortia offer?

    Each institution of an Erasmus Mundus Masters consortium should have an "international office" with adequate opening hours and linguistic coverage. They should offer housing facilities, coaching, language support, activities aiming at social integration as well as assistance with residence permits and social insurance. These services must be of high quality.

  12. How many places are there on an Erasmus Mundus Masters Course for third-country students and visiting scholars?

    Each selected Erasmus Mundus Masters consortium reserves a minimum number of places for third-country students and scholars: about 20 students and 3-4 scholars every year. Erasmus Mundus Masters consortia should ensure an appropriate balance in the distribution of these students and scholars between the partner institutions within the consortium.

  13. Are there also European students on an Erasmus Mundus Masters Course?

    Yes. Erasmus Mundus Masters Courses must also be attended by European students and applying consortia must demonstrate that they have taken the necessary measures to ensure such participation. European students enrolled in Erasmus Mundus Masters Courses can benefit from Action 3.

  14. My current degree is in Literature, Language and Education, or Translation. Am I eligible for the LCT Program?

    Formally, you are eligible to apply to the program with such a degree. The selection committee will carefully review your qualifications to determine whether your background in formal linguistics is sufficient to allow you to successfully participate in the program. Concerning your academic qualification given your degree, it depends how much formal linguistics the courses you followed have covered. It has often been the case so far, that courses for example at literature departments did not fulfill minimal requirements on the linguistics side. There were exceptions but in general literature students do not take the type of formal linguistics courses that are needed for computational linguistics. Catching up in both computer science and linguistics would be too much for the three to four semesters of courses our MSc students do. However, students from "hardcore" linguistics departments typically satisfy the requirements, and thus do not need to catch up on linguistics, only on computer science.

  15. ( This question doesn't apply for intake 2018 ) I am on the reserve list for an Erasmus Mundus scholarship. Why am I being asked to register as a self-financing student?

    If you are placed on the reserve list for an EM scholarship, this means you have been accepted to the LCT program (this was part of your official email notification), and that you are on the waiting list for a scholarship in case of cancellations. If, in case you do not get promoted to receive a scholarship, you wish to attend the program on a self-financing basis, you should follow the instructions you received which asked to log on to your application and click the button that indicates this wish. The deadline for taking this step is generally at the end of April of the respective year. You will then be assigned two LCT partner universities, taking your academic background into consideration, as well as your stated preferences. If you find local funding for a specific LCT partner university, please be sure to inform the central LCT administration by an email to lct-info, it will be taken into account. This allocation is done in May of the respective year; you will get a notification of the allocation as soon as it is available. This indication of interest in enrollment on a self-funding basis is not a binding step for you. The LCT program will allow you to withdraw your registration as a self-financing student, for example, if you are unable to find financing to fund the program. Nevertheless, in order to avoid unnecessary work with determining the allocation and additional administration burden, we ask you to only register as self-funding if you are seriously pursuing this option. Neither registering as a self-funding student, nor withdrawing your self-funding registration will affect your place and ranking on the EM reserve list! You remain on this list unless you specifically instruct us to cancel this place on the list.